Clueless White Woman

About the Clueless White Woman

The basics: I was born in 1978. I am white, a mix of German and Irish and French and English and a little Dutch. I am a convert to Judaism. I am married and have two children.

These things may help you to get an idea of what my perspective on the world is. Part of it was crystallized while growing up. Parts of it are prejudiced and biased (including some weird ones, for example I don’t like California and have no good reason for that at all).

What I am striving to do with my life (and, to a lesser extent, with this blog) is explore the prejudices that I have built into my perspective. I always took “I’m not a racist,” to mean, “I never say or do racist things.” However, racism can be subtler and quieter. That’s where the Clueless descriptor comes in. I, in my white perspective, am quite probably doing little racist things without knowing it or meaning to. And I don’t want to do that.

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4 Comments »

  1. If you ever want to start a family of Clueless White Women, I hope you will adopt me. I first realized exactly how clueless I am after attending a conference called WAM!2008. I actually think that I’m probably not quite as clueless as I think I am, but that’s really not saying very much.

    I found my way here by way of What Tami Said, a blog I absolutely love for the topics covered and the way Tami covers them.

    I’m going to add your blog to my blogroll and maybe, by expanding those who admit to being clueless, we can raise clueless folks to a new level of consciousness – about their cluelessness. Which does seem to be a kind of first step, I think.

    Thanks for taking the time to blog – as a mom (born in 1962) of three (and a by birth Jew who might as well be a convert), I appreciate it very much when others do.

    Comment by Jill — June 25, 2008 @ 2:24 am

  2. Part of being a good ally and anti-racist is seeking for the information yourself. I think that this is a healthy first step. However, I don’t think that this is the most constructive way to move forward because you are asking for it to be given to you.

    Check out these websites/blogs if you want to get a clue:
    racialicious.com
    antiracistparent.com
    raceintheworkplace.com

    Other reading:
    White Like Me by Tim Wise
    The Heart of Whiteness by Robert Jensen
    White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack

    These readings might make you more perceptive and receptive to the people who would be interested in engaging in this kind of dialogue
    Please keep in mind one thing. By no means does one individual’s point of view or experience of every person in the race that she or he belongs to. Also consider that intersections of race, gender, class, orientation, etc. may/will defintely account for why you might find yourself feeling yourseld distant from someone you might have expected to connect with.

    Comment by LeavingAClue — June 26, 2008 @ 7:38 pm

  3. @LeavingAClue: this blog is only intended to be a small part of my process — I’ve actually got all the blogs you recommend on my daily RSS feed already 🙂 Thank you for the book recommendations, though.

    I did not intend to ask for answers to be handed to me. However, I’m not sure how one can get clued in without asking for help as part of the process. I can read until my eyes fall out, and I will still need to have conversations about what I think I’ve learned. At the moment I don’t have an in-person discussion group for this sort of thing (I don’t think googling for “racist support group” would get me quite what I need!) so I’m blogging in the meantime.

    Comment by clueless — June 27, 2008 @ 12:31 pm

  4. Hey clueless,

    You make an excellent point. I wish you luck with your blogging, and if you ever have any explicit questions, ask away.

    Comment by LeavingAClue — June 28, 2008 @ 6:16 pm


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